Best Places to Live in the U.S

U.S. News analyzed the 125 most populous metro areas to find the best places to live. To make the top of the list, a business had to have good value, be a desirable place to live, have a strong job market, and high quality of life.

There’s a lot of individual preference involved in deciding on the best place to live. Factors like family proximity, climate and community size can all influence your decision.

However, some common themes should be taken into consideration when deciding on a new place to live.

To assemble our list of the best places to live, we looked at six factors in 50 of the most populous U.S. cities. Keep in mind many smaller communities around these larger cities may be equally desirable places.

 

Here Are Best Places to Live in the U.S 2020

 

10. Raleigh & Durham, NC

Raleigh, North Carolina
Raleigh, North Carolina

Raleigh, Durham and Chapel Hill are known for their research/technology roots and collegiate rivalries. However, this tri-city region (known as the Triangle) lures new residents daily with solid job growth and high quality of life.

 

9. Seattle, Washington

Seattle
Seattle

To answer the question on many people’s minds: “No, it doesn’t rain all the time.” Seattle gets less rain annually than Boston, New York City, Philadelphia, Miami and many other major metro areas.

The natural beauty of Seattle – surrounded by both mountains and water on two sides – is one of the biggest draws for residents.

 

8. Portland, Oregon

Portland, Oregon
Portland, Oregon

Portland’s population toes the line between an innocent playfulness and a shameless wild side. Naked bicycle rides, a fully costumed adult soapbox derby and Voodoo Doughnuts, a bakery that is known for making one-of-a-kind donuts,

Are sampling of ways residents live up to the unofficial city motto: “Keep Portland Weird.” Locals tend to be friendly and laid-back while maintaining a healthy work ethic.

 

7. San Francisco, California

San Francisco
San Francisco

A beautiful region filled with iconic landmarks, independently-owned businesses, and trendsetting residents, San Francisco has long followed the beat of its drum. Morphed and moulded by its communities, the California metro area has been the heart of the bohemian lifestyle,

The epicentre of the LGBT rights movement and the launching point of the technology era. Today, San Francisco is a complete universe in and of itself: Each neighbourhood exudes its personality, from the historic streets of the Mission District to the grassy hills of the Presidio to the bustling piers along the Embarcadero.

 

6. Minneapolis, Minnesota

Minneapolis
Minneapolis

Minneapolis and St. Paul have big-city amenities like museums and sports stadiums and have an approachable Midwestern feel.

Separated by the Mississippi River, the Twin Cities are considered one metropolitan area but include two unique cities, featuring downtown cosmopolitan cores surrounded by distinctive neighbourhoods and suburban communities.

 

5. Des Moines, Iowa

Des Moines, Iowa
Des Moines,

The capital of this so-called flyover state may not top your to-visit list, but Des Moines is a great place to live and raise a family.

Elegant colonial and Tudor-style homes built in the early 1900s hide in quiet neighbourhoods minutes from buzzy downtown, where lofts and condos draw the millennial crowd. Instead, many families with kids flock to the suburbs, where new housing developments continually pop up.

 

4. Fayetteville, Arkansas

Fayetteville, Arkansas
Fayetteville, Arkansas

Located in a region experiencing drastic growth, Fayetteville – together with Bentonville, Rogers and Springdale – has transformed from a small town to a center of higher education, culture, commerce and entrepreneurialism.

The area known as Northwest Arkansas is the birthplace of Walmart, the headquarters of Tyson Foods and the home of the University of Arkansas, the flagship campus of the U of A system.

 

3. Colorado Springs, Colorado

Colorado springs
Colorado springs

Colorado Springs might not jump off the map as an economic or cultural hub the way larger metro areas like Denver do. But in a quieter, gentler way, Colorado Springs has much to offer, including a low cost of living, a low unemployment rate and a variety of recreation and entertainment options.

Colorado Springs attracts students, professionals and military personnel to the area with a cache of military bases and nationally ranked colleges.

 

2. Denver, Colorado

Denver
Denver

Founded in the mid-1800s as a mining hub during the gold rush, Denver has come long since its Wild West days. Over time, its residents have evolved from gunslinging gamblers into an easygoing crowd of ambitious, progressive-minded fitness fanatics and nature lovers who are eager to push the envelope on everything from civil rights to drug laws.

Nicknamed the Mile High City for its 5,280-foot elevation (although officially reported as 5,279 feet), Denver’s location at the base of the Rocky Mountains provides a gateway to a slew of outdoor pursuits. However, it is probably best known for its devout ski and snowboard enthusiasts.

 

1. Austin, Texas

Austin
Austin

People are drawn to the Texas capital’s music, outdoor spaces and cultural institutions. Austin was established along the Colorado River on the edge of the Hill Country in 1839. Originally named “Waterloo,” Austin remains rich in history, from the bronze statue of Stevie Ray Vaughan that greets visitors near the river, to the stately Capitol that anchors downtown, to the LBJ Presidential Library at the University of Texas at Austin.

Named the Live Music Capital of the World, Austin has a plethora of music venues and local bands to entertain endless crowds. However, musicians should think about finances before moving, as many say it’s challenging to make a living in music in Austin.